From the daily archives: Sunday, April 6, 2014

An experimental medicine developed by slowed the pace of advanced breast cancer, doubling the amount of time that patients could live without their tumors advancing.

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Wall Street’s finest tells NetNet where they worked before making it big.

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The market has been treating you well in recent years. You have been in the right stocks. You have amassed a small fortune. And now you’re asking yourself some questions:

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Just as Wall Street league tables rank firms by the size of their deals, author Michael Lewis provides his own hierarchy in the way his latest book describes banks’ stock-trading divisions. In Lewis’s telling, Goldman Sachs Group Inc. (GS) reformed and is treating customers more fairly, especially after a management change last year at its electronic-trading unit. By contrast, Lewis describes an …

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The Nasdaq down by 2.6 per cent led Wall Street lower on Friday after the US non-farm payrolls jobs data came in below expectations and traders sold momentum stocks from the tech sector.

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Padres-Marlins Gameflash for game played on April 6, 2014

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A look at where some of the financial industry’s most successful players worked to help pay for college.

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General Motors dealers across the country will begin fixing faulty ignition switches on Chevrolet Cobalts and other models this Monday, says the Wall Street Journal.

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Concern over fallout from Michael Lewis’ new book “Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt” led investors to slam shares in exchange-related companies last week, but fears about Nasdaq OMX Group look overdone, according to an article in the April 7 edition of Barron’s. The U.S. Attorney General said on Friday that the Justice Department is investigating high-speed trading for possible insider trading …

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The New York Times yesterday suggested that Warren Buffett’s recent investment performance has been sub-par. Nothing could be further from the truth. At 83, the Sage of Omaha still has many more years ahead of him as one of the greatest investors in history.

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